Alan Kitching, Letterpress Design:

The computer age has transformed the way that graphic designers work, more often than not InDesign and Photoshop are our tools, rather than the furniture, quoins and keys that our ancestors used alongside their printing presses before us. Few designers today are lucky enough to have access to a printing press, let alone know how to use it. Alan Kitching is one such designer that has managed to master this art form.

When digital printing and computers arrived in the 90’s, he returned to his letterpress printing roots. His punchy type is used in so many different ways, anything from informative infographics and maps to bold statement-based posters. When asked by other designers ‘What is your favourite typeface?' Kitching always replies with 'The one I am using’.

Alan Kitching is a typographic designer with a unique sense of placement, colour and design, he manages to remain relevant and intriguing using tools that are considered redundant in a digital world. To see more of his typographic work, click here.

Bold Colour or Gentle Lines:

The illustrations and other assets that I had already made were easily transferrable to the new, more scientific visual style that I had developed, and firstly I simply substituted the browns, blues and purples for a selection of monochrome greys, whites and blacks. Partnered with the Multiply blending option, the yellow of the paper bled through; I liked the way this looked, as it was reminiscent of the old and tattered scientific documents that I had previously researched.

However, along with the bold header at the top, the grey illustrations make the page look congested and dirty. I then tried a different approach; I changed the illustrations and the header at the top of the page to lines. That way, both were still clear graphical assets but didn’t make the spread (and the overall book) feel as heavy, also by doing this, both assets seemed to work better within the scientific visual style.

Germany Is Sixty Years Old - Golden Section Graphics:
For the 60th Birthday of Germany, Golden Section Graphics produced this giant infographic for 23/05/2009. The poster shows the most important demographic and economic changes over Germany’s life, since the Federal Republic of Germany was created in 1949. The number of inhabitants has almost doubled since it was founded.
The poster is a great homage to the country, using meticulous points and line length, and uses the black, red and yellow of the flag. At first glance the information looks unbearably complicated, but it is only when you start looking at the individual graphs and charts within the overall image you can see Golden Section Graphics’ beautiful handling of data, type and graphic design.
The infographic has a real presence on the page and immediately, through its visual language, can be considered as fact and accurate data. For more of Golden Section Graphics’ work, head over to their website here.

Germany Is Sixty Years Old - Golden Section Graphics:

For the 60th Birthday of Germany, Golden Section Graphics produced this giant infographic for 23/05/2009. The poster shows the most important demographic and economic changes over Germany’s life, since the Federal Republic of Germany was created in 1949. The number of inhabitants has almost doubled since it was founded.

The poster is a great homage to the country, using meticulous points and line length, and uses the black, red and yellow of the flag. At first glance the information looks unbearably complicated, but it is only when you start looking at the individual graphs and charts within the overall image you can see Golden Section Graphics’ beautiful handling of data, type and graphic design.

The infographic has a real presence on the page and immediately, through its visual language, can be considered as fact and accurate data. For more of Golden Section Graphics’ work, head over to their website here.