Graze Boxes - Healthy Snacking, For Children?

Graze offer the user a chance to receive a selection box through the post periodically, these boxes consist of four healthy snacks that the buyer can feast on. These boxes cost just £3.89 including postage costs, with the first box being half price.

Whilst I am looking into healthy eating/drinking for children, it may be an appropriate way of getting them introduced into new foods through a periodical magazine that includes free fruit/nuts. Perhaps these free samples could come with a recipe that breaks the fruits down for children into smoothies or cakes. The most important thing here is introducing children into new healthy flavours and getting them away from sugary sweets and fizzy drinks - through applying Graze’s business strategy to a younger market.

The only problem with this strategy is that the fruit will need to be dried so it does not go mouldy, this detracts from the freshness aspect, so these ingredients could be a component in a recipe that other ingredients would have to be part of.

Dr Seuss - Green Eggs And Ham:
Creating a narrative for a children’s book is difficult. You have to ask a lot of questions about your story; has it been done before? Is it similar to another narrative? Is it compelling enough for children to read? Will children understand the story? To aid my search for a strong narrative for children, I’ve decided to look through stories that I grew up with, and stories that I feel hold a strong narrative.
The zany and whacky Dr. Seuss is loved by adults and children alike, with films like The Cat In The Hat, Horton Hears A Who, How The Grinch Stole Christmas, and The Lorax becoming household favourites in the years after 2000. Published by Random House in 1960, Green Eggs And Ham remains a narrative that is close to the hearts of many. Through it, Dr. Seuss teaches us phonetic language, and how to say ‘no’:

I am Sam. Sam I am. 
That Sam-I-am! That Sam-I-am! I do not like that Sam-I-am!
Do you like green eggs and ham?
I do not like them, Sam-I-am. I do not like green eggs and ham.
Would you like them here or there?
I would not like them here or there. I would not like them anywhere. I do not like green eggs and ham. I do not like them, Sam-I-am. 
Would you like them in a house? Would you like them with a mouse?
I do not like them in a house. I do not like them with a mouse. I do not like them here or there. I do not like them anywhere. I do not like green eggs and ham. I do not like them, Sam-I-am.
Would you eat them in a box? Would you eat them with a fox? 
Not in a box. Not with a fox. Not in a house. Not with a mouse. I would not eat them here or there. I would not eat them anywhere. I would not eat green eggs and ham. I do not like them, Sam-I-am.
Would you? Could you? In a car? Eat them! Eat them! Here they are.
I would not, could not, in a car. You may like them. You will see. You may like them in a tree!
I would not, could not in a tree. Not in a car! You let me be. I do not like them in a box. I do not like them with a fox. I do not like them in a house. I do not like them with a mouse. I do not like them here or there. I do not like them anywhere. I do not like green eggs and ham. I do not like them, Sam-I-am.  
- Dr Seuss, Green Eggs And Ham

Dr Seuss - Green Eggs And Ham:

Creating a narrative for a children’s book is difficult. You have to ask a lot of questions about your story; has it been done before? Is it similar to another narrative? Is it compelling enough for children to read? Will children understand the story? To aid my search for a strong narrative for children, I’ve decided to look through stories that I grew up with, and stories that I feel hold a strong narrative.

The zany and whacky Dr. Seuss is loved by adults and children alike, with films like The Cat In The Hat, Horton Hears A Who, How The Grinch Stole Christmas, and The Lorax becoming household favourites in the years after 2000. Published by Random House in 1960, Green Eggs And Ham remains a narrative that is close to the hearts of many. Through it, Dr. Seuss teaches us phonetic language, and how to say ‘no’:

I am Sam. Sam I am.

That Sam-I-am! That Sam-I-am! I do not like that Sam-I-am!

Do you like green eggs and ham?

I do not like them, Sam-I-am. I do not like green eggs and ham.

Would you like them here or there?

I would not like them here or there. I would not like them anywhere. I do not like green eggs and ham. I do not like them, Sam-I-am. 

Would you like them in a house? Would you like them with a mouse?

I do not like them in a house. I do not like them with a mouse. I do not like them here or there. I do not like them anywhere. I do not like green eggs and ham. I do not like them, Sam-I-am.

Would you eat them in a box? Would you eat them with a fox?

Not in a box. Not with a fox. Not in a house. Not with a mouse. I would not eat them here or there. I would not eat them anywhere. I would not eat green eggs and ham. I do not like them, Sam-I-am.

Would you? Could you? In a car? Eat them! Eat them! Here they are.

I would not, could not, in a car. You may like them. You will see. You may like them in a tree!

I would not, could not in a tree. Not in a car! You let me be. I do not like them in a box. I do not like them with a fox. I do not like them in a house. I do not like them with a mouse. I do not like them here or there. I do not like them anywhere. I do not like green eggs and ham. I do not like them, Sam-I-am.  

- Dr Seuss, Green Eggs And Ham

One Hungry Monster - A Counting Book In Rhyme:
Creating a narrative for a children’s book is difficult. You have to ask a lot of questions about your story; has it been done before? Is it similar to another narrative? Is it compelling enough for children to read? Will children understand the story? To aid my search for a strong narrative for children, I’ve decided to look through stories that I grew up with, and stories that I feel hold a strong narrative.
One Hungry Monster depicts the tale of a little boy that is woken up in the night to find monsters demanding something to eat, eventually more and more hungry monsters invite themselves in as they smell food. The story is not only fun for children and parents, but it also secretly educates children, as they learn to count and read as they go through. The story is written in a simple fashion, and we follow the story until ten monsters fill the boy’s home:


One hungry monster underneath my bed, moaning and groaning and begging to be fed!
Two hungry monsters at my wardrobe door, chewing up my trainers, and asking me for more!
Three hungry monsters in the upstairs hall, lick the flower paintings hanging on the wall!
Four hungry monsters around my Daddy’s bed, sniffing out the crackers that he’d eaten in his bed!
Five hungry monsters sliding down the rail, munching and crunching on one another’s tail!
Six hungry monsters underneath the rug, tracking down some footprints to catch a tasty bug!
Seven hungry monsters around our TV screen, drooling at commercials of sauerkraut and beans!
Eight hungry monsters on the chandeliers, they swear they haven’t eaten for almost twenty years!
Nine hungry monsters wearing roller skates, hunting through the kitchen for knives and forks and plates!
Ten hungry monsters about to fuss and kick, wont get out, they tell me, unless I feed them quick!
So I bring out one jug of apple juice, two loaves of bread, three bowls of spaghetti that they dump upon my head! 
Four red tomatoes, five pickled pears, six orange pumpkins that they climb up and down like stairs!
Seven roasted turkeys, eight apple pies, nine watermelons that they wish were twice the size!
Ten jars of peanut butter but not a speck of jam, ‘cause I want every monster mouth shut tighter than a clam!
Then from behind the toaster, I looked behind and got, a little apple muffin, that the monsters couldn’t spot!

- Susan Heyboer O’Keefe, One Hungry Monster

One Hungry Monster - A Counting Book In Rhyme:

Creating a narrative for a children’s book is difficult. You have to ask a lot of questions about your story; has it been done before? Is it similar to another narrative? Is it compelling enough for children to read? Will children understand the story? To aid my search for a strong narrative for children, I’ve decided to look through stories that I grew up with, and stories that I feel hold a strong narrative.

One Hungry Monster depicts the tale of a little boy that is woken up in the night to find monsters demanding something to eat, eventually more and more hungry monsters invite themselves in as they smell food. The story is not only fun for children and parents, but it also secretly educates children, as they learn to count and read as they go through. The story is written in a simple fashion, and we follow the story until ten monsters fill the boy’s home:

One hungry monster underneath my bed, moaning and groaning and begging to be fed!

Two hungry monsters at my wardrobe door, chewing up my trainers, and asking me for more!

Three hungry monsters in the upstairs hall, lick the flower paintings hanging on the wall!

Four hungry monsters around my Daddy’s bed, sniffing out the crackers that he’d eaten in his bed!

Five hungry monsters sliding down the rail, munching and crunching on one another’s tail!

Six hungry monsters underneath the rug, tracking down some footprints to catch a tasty bug!

Seven hungry monsters around our TV screen, drooling at commercials of sauerkraut and beans!

Eight hungry monsters on the chandeliers, they swear they haven’t eaten for almost twenty years!

Nine hungry monsters wearing roller skates, hunting through the kitchen for knives and forks and plates!

Ten hungry monsters about to fuss and kick, wont get out, they tell me, unless I feed them quick!

So I bring out one jug of apple juice, two loaves of bread, three bowls of spaghetti that they dump upon my head! 

Four red tomatoes, five pickled pears, six orange pumpkins that they climb up and down like stairs!

Seven roasted turkeys, eight apple pies, nine watermelons that they wish were twice the size!

Ten jars of peanut butter but not a speck of jam, ‘cause I want every monster mouth shut tighter than a clam!

Then from behind the toaster, I looked behind and got, a little apple muffin, that the monsters couldn’t spot!

- Susan Heyboer O’Keefe, One Hungry Monster