Faraday Suit - Lotta Nieminen:

Inspired by her previous work for fashion label Kinnunen, Finnish designer Lotta Nieminen created this book to house K I Kinnunen master’s thesis in 2010.

The book takes inspiration from fashion publications with classy typographic choices and overall boldness, and turns this inspiration into a sharp, modern piece of editorial design. The body text effortlessly works with the annotations and footnotes that surround it, and through justification of the text the text is able to remain sharp throughout. The thick black borders and bold typographic usage make the text feel impactful, whilst the spot coloured footnotes help add a typographic hierarchy for readers.

To see more of Nieminen’s work, or for a more in depth look at Faraday Suit, click here.

Top Ten Typefaces Used in Book Design - Font Feed:

The annual ‘Book Jacket and Journal Show’, run by The American Association of University Presses (AAUP), exhibits the best in book design from across the USA and puts it on display for all to see. This year typography website Font Feed have tallied up the most common typefaces used by the winners from previous years of the show, and have created a collection of the top ten fonts used by book design award winners.

The typeface most commonly used was Minion; a typeface with delicate serifs that can be used in a wide range of ways:

'With a set of 64 fonts in various optical size masters and a condensed option, Minion is one of the most complete serif families available. Add to that an economical width and what might be the most powerful endorsement of any book face — Robert Bringhurst used it for his seminal “Elements of Typographic Style” — and it’s no surprise that Minion is the most common typeface used in all three catalogs of the AAUP show.'

- Stephen Coles, Font Feed

Is it worth noticing that 7 of the 10 most popular typefaces used by award winners are serif fonts? This could be a current trend, or it could be reflective of the intended use of serif typefaces; serif are predominantly used for print-based media, whilst sans serif are usually reserved for screen/web-based projects (see infographic).

To see the complete range of typefaces from 1 to 10, including a review of each courtesy of Font Feed, click here.

Young People Prefer Print - The Guardian:
Young people aged from 16 to 24 years of age are considered the ‘digital generation’ for the most part, they have been the most exposed to social networking and major digital advancements in their lifetime. You may consider that this demographic can hardly be prized away from their mobile phones or televisions, but in a recent survey it was revealed that 62% of 16 to 24 year olds prefer to read books in print format, as opposed to the digital alternatives on eReaders.
Statisticians at Voxburner used nearly 2000 young adults in their 2013 survey, Liz Bury reported for The Guardian newspaper:

The two big reasons for preferring print are value for money and an emotional connection to physical books. On questions of ebook pricing, 28% think that ebooks should be half their current price, while just 8% say that ebook pricing is right.
The top-rated reasons for preferring physical to digital products were: “I like to hold the product” (51%), “I am not restricted to a particular device” (20%), “I can easily share it” (10%), “I like the packaging” (9%), and “I can sell it when used” (6%)’
- Liz Bury, The Guardian

The tactility of paper books aids in their reading, and it appears that young readers of today want books to be supplied to them in a different format than digital. More qualitative comments given by those surveyed included comments like: ‘I collect’, 'I like the smell' and 'I want to have full bookshelves'. Books are a quantitative status symbol, and people enjoy having collections. After all, you can’t see the books that people have read when they are hidden on their Kindle or iPad.
To read Liz Bury’s article about young readers, click here to see the article on The Guardian’s website in full.

Young People Prefer Print - The Guardian:

Young people aged from 16 to 24 years of age are considered the ‘digital generation’ for the most part, they have been the most exposed to social networking and major digital advancements in their lifetime. You may consider that this demographic can hardly be prized away from their mobile phones or televisions, but in a recent survey it was revealed that 62% of 16 to 24 year olds prefer to read books in print format, as opposed to the digital alternatives on eReaders.

Statisticians at Voxburner used nearly 2000 young adults in their 2013 survey, Liz Bury reported for The Guardian newspaper:

The two big reasons for preferring print are value for money and an emotional connection to physical books. On questions of ebook pricing, 28% think that ebooks should be half their current price, while just 8% say that ebook pricing is right.

The top-rated reasons for preferring physical to digital products were: “I like to hold the product” (51%), “I am not restricted to a particular device” (20%), “I can easily share it” (10%), “I like the packaging” (9%), and “I can sell it when used” (6%)’

- Liz Bury, The Guardian

The tactility of paper books aids in their reading, and it appears that young readers of today want books to be supplied to them in a different format than digital. More qualitative comments given by those surveyed included comments like: ‘I collect’, 'I like the smell' and 'I want to have full bookshelves'. Books are a quantitative status symbol, and people enjoy having collections. After all, you can’t see the books that people have read when they are hidden on their Kindle or iPad.

To read Liz Bury’s article about young readers, click here to see the article on The Guardian’s website in full.